button-radnet
FIND AN IMAGING CENTER
×
OUR SERVICES
Procedures
Angiogram

An angiogram is an X-ray exam of the arteries and veins to diagnose blockages and other blood vessel problems. It can reveal the integrity of the cardiovascular system in specific areas throughout the body. Combined with the use of intravenous contrast medium injected via a catheter, an angiogram identifies areas of blockage or damaged vessels within the circulatory system. CT and MRI may also be used to gain additional images of the arteries.

Arthrogram

An arthrogram is an X-ray exam of a joint, using a contrast agent and fluoroscopy (a live motion X-Ray). It is used to diagnose the cause of pain or restricted motion of a joint as well as injury to the components of the joint including, the tendons, soft tissues, ligaments, labrum, cartilage and bones. Often this procedure is used to image the shoulder and hip joints, and it is also used when investigating the knees, elbows, ankles and wrists. CT and MRI may also be used to gain additional images of the joint.

Bone Density Scan (DEXA)

A dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan measures the density and mineral content in bone, most often in the hip or lower spine. It is the most accurate method of determining bone density and potential problems related to bone loss. This test is a valuable tool for diagnosing osteoporosis, which often has no symptoms until you suffer a fracture. A bone density scan can diagnose the disease at its earliest stages, which means you can begin receiving treatment to protect your bones sooner.

Carotid Ultrasound

Carotid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the carotid arteries in the neck which carry blood from the heart to the brain. A Doppler ultrasound study, a technique that evaluates blood flow through a blood vessel, is usually a part of this exam. It is most frequently used to screen patients for blockage or narrowing of the carotid arteries which may increase the risk of stroke.

Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring

This exam is part of a sophisticated high-speed CT exam of the heart. During the scan, which takes just seconds, the equipment measures the amount of calcium present and calculates a score. The lower the score, the lower the potential risk of an adverse future cardiac injury. (Calcium often covers the atherosclerotic plaque that builds up inside arteries.  This plaque and calcium can lead to narrowing of the inside of the arteries which could in turn lead to an increased risk of angina, and a heart attack.) This test can assess coronary heart disease, which is often asymptomatic and is the most common cause of death for patients in the United States.

Digital Mammography

Mammography is a type of low-dose X-ray of the breast. It reveals masses and micro-calcifications within and around the breast that may indicate breast problems including, but not just limited to cancer.

Experts recommend a mammography screening of the breasts at regular intervals to increase the chance of early cancer detection and treatment. The American College of Radiology recommends women aged 40 and older should have a screening mammogram every year and should continue to do so for as long as they are in good health.

Digital X-Ray

X-ray is the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. It is also the fastest, and easiest and most economical way for a physician to view and assess broken bones.

During the procedure, electromagnetic radiation passes through the body onto “film” (now digitized and displayed on a computer screen). Dense structures such as bone absorb most of the radiation and appear white on the digital image. Structures that are less dense like air appear black. Everything in between appears a different shade of gray.

Enterography

This is an accurate and noninvasive imaging procedure used to assess and evaluate certain gastrointestinal problems, such as inflammatory bowel disease (including Crohn’s Disease), infectious enteritis, lymphoma or tuberculosis. It also can be used in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding to determine if a small bowel polyp is causing the bleeding. Enterography may be performed using MRI or CT.

Lower Dose Lung CT Screening

Lung cancer CT screening is one of the most accurate diagnostic tools for finding lung cancer at an early stage, when it is most treatable. CT scans of the lung are able to detect small abnormalities in the lungs that could be the beginning stages of lung cancer. These indicators are often not visible on a routine chest X-ray. Since a CT lung screening offers the best opportunity for successful treatment of lung cancer before symptoms are noticed, more physicians are opting for lung cancer screening based on risk factors (like smoking and family history), rather than symptoms.

OB Ultrasound

One of the more frequent applications of ultrasound is in the evaluation of a fetus. Most obstetricians perform a routine diagnostic ultrasound to look for any abnormalities with either the fetus or the mother’s anatomy during early pregnancy. Depending on the time of gestation and positioning, the gender may or may not be identified. This ultrasound procedure is painless and non-invasive.

Pelvic Ultrasound

Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures and organs in the lower abdomen and pelvis. There are various types of pelvic ultrasound including abdominal, vaginal and rectal. These exams are frequently used to evaluate the reproductive and urinary systems. Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive and does not use ionizing radiation.

Prostate MRI

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the structures within a man’s prostate gland. It is primarily used to evaluate the extent of prostate cancer and determine whether it has spread. It also may be used to help diagnose infection, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or congenital abnormalities.

Renal Ultrasound

A renal ultrasound is a safe and painless test that uses sound waves to produce images of the kidneys and bladder. The kidneys are a pair of bean-shaped organs located toward the back of the abdominal cavity, just above the waist. They remove waste products from the blood and produce urine.  

Scrotum Ultrasound

Ultrasound imaging of the scrotum uses sound waves to produce an image of a man’s testicles and the surrounding tissue. It is primarily used to help evaluate disorders of the testicles, and scrotum. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation.

Sinus CT

CT of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the nasal cavity. CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. It’s also the most reliable imaging technique for determining if the sinuses are obstructed and the best imaging modality for sinusitis.

Thyroid Ultrasound

Thyroid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce images of the thyroid gland in the neck. This procedure is typically used to evaluate lumps (or nodules) found during a routine physical and to determine if they are the more common benign nodule or if they have features that require a biopsy. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation.

Transvaginal Ultrasound

Transvaginal ultrasound imaging of the abdomen uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures and organs in and around a woman's uterus. Transvaginal (TV) ultrasounds are performed very much like a gynecologic exam and involves the insertion of an ultrasound transducer into the vagina to study the lining of the uterus. These exams are frequently used to evaluate the reproductive and urinary systems. Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive and does not use ionizing radiation.