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Your care and safety is our top priority. We are diligently working to keep our centers safe and accessible for all your urgent or essential medical imaging needs. We are screening our staff and potential patients for COVID-19 related symptoms and acting accordingly. During this time, we recommend you consult with your physician to determine if your exam is urgent and essential.

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OUR SERVICES

At Murray Hill Radiology and Mammography, we are committed to providing high quality and efficient radiology services for the benefit of our patients while at the same time being very attentive to the personal and emotional needs of each individual.

Full-Field Digital and 3D Mammography

Our office is fully equipped with the latest technology available including 3D Mammography. With our vast amount of expertise and state-of-the-art equiptment we are able to provide our patients with the most precise mammogram results.

Digital 2D Mammogram:

A digital 2D mammogram is different from the traditional analog method in that instead of capturing an image onto film, the information is converted into electrical signals which form a digital image. It is similar to the technology used in a digital camera. Digital mammograms are approved by the FDA, and studies have shown besides using less radiation, the results are more accurate than those from the traditional analog exams.

3D Mammography:

3D mammography or tomosynthesis is an FDA-approved technology that complements digital 2D mammography. While traditional mammography generates 2D images, 3D mammography creates multiple thin 3D image slices that allow each section of the breast tissue to be seen more clearly. A 3D mammogram looks and feels like a regular mammogram. An x-ray arm scans over your breast taking multiple 3D images at various angles. Each scan takes about 4 seconds and the entire 3D mammogram lasts about 5 minutes.

Whether you have a digital 2D mammogram or elect to add 3D technology to your exam, the images are sent to the doctor's high resolution flat screen monitors for rapid precise viewing. They can also be sent to other radiologists, allowing for immediate consultations. Additional images, if needed, can be taken swiftly at the same time as the initial exam, avoiding the inconvenience and anxiety that can occur when coming for a second visit.

Types of mammograms include:

Mammography

A diagnostic mammogram is performed on a patient when she has an abnormal finding on physical examination, a worrisome symptom, or a finding on a screening mammogram that needs special attention and evaluation. Typically extra images targeted to the area of interest are done in addition to the standard ones taken during a screening mammogram.

You will meet with the technologist who will take the necessary images of each breast. The images are immediately sent to the radiologist's workstation, where they are viewed and compared with prior exams. Once the images have been studied, you will meet with the radiologist who will perform a physical examination of your breasts, discuss the results of your exam, answer your questions and make any pertinent recommendations. A second radiologist from our practice will reread your exam and report for added assurance.

Sometimes, when a problem is being evaluated, an additional imaging test such as a sonogram, an MRI, or a needle biopsy may be recommended.

Breast Ultrasound

A breast ultrasound (sonogram) is a diagnostic imaging test used to examine the tissues inside the breast by utilizing high-frequency sound waves that create digital images. These images are captured in real time and can also show blood flowing through veins and arteries in the area.

A breast ultrasound is commonly performed while screening for breast cancer in women with dense breasts or high risk patients. It is also performed after breast abnormalities are found during a physical examination, mammogram, or MRI. This procedure can be used to determine the cause of breast symptoms, monitor the size of a cyst or a growth, diagnose a cyst or tumor in the breast, or guide the placement of a needle for a biopsy or drainage procedure. A breast ultrasound should not be performed in place of a mammogram, but is a highly effective supplemental test that can search for potential problems that may otherwise not be detected.

This procedure does not expose the patient to any ionizing radiation and is considered safe for all patients, including pregnant women.

Types of breast ultrasound include:

Screening Breast Ultrasound

A screening breast sonogram is recommended for women at high risk for developing breast cancer and for women whose mammograms show dense breast tissue or a complicated pattern that could camouflage a tumor. You will meet with the radiologist who will perform the scan and take standard images of each breast. Once the images have been studied and correlated with previous studies and mammograms, you will sit down with your radiologist who will discuss the results of your exam, answer your questions and make any pertinent recommendations. When the report is finalized it will be sent to your referring physician.

Diagnostic Breast Ultrasound

A diagnostic breast sonogram is performed when a patient has a worrisome symptom, an abnormal finding on physical examination, or a finding on a mammogram or breast MRI that needs further evaluation. In addition to the standard images taken during a screening exam, the radiologist will take images targeted to the area of concern.

The images are immediately sent and compared with prior exams. Once the images have been studied, you will meet with the radiologist who will discuss the results of your exam, answer your questions, perform a physical examination of your breasts and make any pertinent recommendations. Once the report is finalized it will be sent to your referring physician.

Breast Biopsy

Our Radiologists perform minimally invasive needle biopsies of the breast in our office using Ultrasound, Mammographic (Stereotactic) or MRI guidance, as indicated by the individual case. These appointments are scheduled promptly, sometimes on the same day. Results are available 1-2 working days after the procedure. We strive to make this procedure as comfortable as possible.

Types of breast biopsy include:

3D Stereotactic Guided Breast Biopsy

A stereotactic guided needle biopsy of the breast is a non-surgical approach that uses specialized digital 3D mammography equipment to guide the radiologist with pinpoint precision to biopsy an area of suspected abnormality.

This is an outpatient procedure that lasts about an hour and is performed with a local anesthetic. Digital 3D mammographic images targeted to the area to be biopsied are taken. The radiologist uses these images to calculate exactly where to insert the needle once the anesthetic has taken effect. The needle used is powered by a device that is "vacuum-assisted", allowing for all necessary tissue samples to be obtained through one needle insertion. The breast tissue samples are sent to a pathology lab, where a pathologist reviews them and determines whether or not cancer is present. Results are available in 1-2 working days, and will be discussed with you and your referring physician once they are received.

Patients who take aspirin or anti-inflammatory medications regularly should consult with their referring physician and stop seven days prior to the biopsy. Those medications can be resumed 48 hours after the biopsy. Patients taking blood thinners such as Coumadin (Warfarin) need to stop those as well, but only with special instructions from their referring physicians.

Ultrasound Guided Breast Biopsy

An ultrasound-guided core biopsy is recommended when a nodule is initially seen on a mammogram or breast MRI or only on an ultrasound exam.

The patient lies on her back on a table while the physician locates the abnormality on ultrasound. The skin is sterilized and numbed with a local anesthetic.

During the biopsy the radiologist scans the breast with a hand-held ultrasound transducer in order to see the tip of the needle and confirm that it is precisely in the correct spot. While taking a tissue sample, the equipment will make a clicking sound. Small areas of tissue are removed painlessly from the abnormal area and sent for testing.

The tissue samples are sent to a pathology lab for further testing, and you and your doctor will be given the results in 1-2 working days.

Patients who take aspirin or anti-inflammatory medications regularly should consult with their referring physician and stop seven days prior to the biopsy. Those medications can be resumed 48 hours after the biopsy. Patients taking blood thinners such as Coumadin (Warfarin) need to stop those as well, but only with special instructions from their referring physicians.

MRI Guided Vacuum Assisted Breast Biopsy

An MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy is performed on breast abnormalities that cannot be felt or seen on mammography or breast sonography. As with other breast biopsies, it draws tissue samples from breast abnormalities to determine whether or not they are cancerous. "Vacuum-assisted" refers to the vacuum-powered needle used during the biopsy, allowing for all necessary tissue samples to be obtained through one needle insertion.

This kind of breast biopsy lasts about 45 minutes and is performed on an outpatient basis with a local anesthetic. After the anesthetic has made your breast numb, a tiny incision will be made at the insertion site of the biopsy needle. The needle is then inserted through the incision, and an MRI is done to ensure that the needle has been inserted into the abnormality. With the assistance of vacuum power, several tissue samples are then pulled out from the breast and into a special container.

After the tissue samples have been obtained, the needle is removed from the breast and pressure is applied to the site of the biopsy to stop any bleeding. A bandage is then applied to the area. You will return home the same day, although exercise and other strenuous activities should be avoided for 24 hours. The tissue samples are sent to a pathology lab for further testing, and you and your doctor will be given the results in 1-2 working days.

Patients who take aspirin or anti-inflammatory medications regularly should consult with their referring physician and stop seven days prior to the biopsy. Those medications can be resumed 48 hours after the biopsy. Patients taking blood thinners such as Coumadin (Warfarin) need to stop those as well, but only with special instructions from their referring physicians.

Needle Localization of the Breast

A needle localized surgical breast biopsy is recommended when a breast abnormality is seen on a mammogram, breast ultrasound, or breast MRI but cannot be felt or accurately biopsied with a needle. Using the same kind of imaging for guidance, the radiologist introduces a thin metal wire into the abnormal area in the breast, enabling the surgeon to remove that region with great precision. The tissue is then studied by the pathologist to determine whether or not it is cancerous.

Breast Cyst Aspiration

A breast cyst is a fluid-filled pouch that commonly forms in women's breasts, and ultrasound can precisely help the radiologist direct a needle into it in order to drain out its contents.

Breast cyst aspiration is done as an outpatient procedure. It usually takes minutes to perform, and you remain awake the entire time. This procedure offers more precise results than breast cyst aspirations that are not performed with ultrasound guidance.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive, radiation-free scanning technology that uses radio waves and magnetic fields to produce clear and detailed three-dimensional images of nearly any organ or hard and soft tissues in the body.

Types of MRIs include:

Breast MRI

Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a newer technology most often used to evaluate the breasts of women at very high risk for breast cancer or those with recently diagnosed breast cancer. It does not replace mammography or breast ultrasound in these patients, but may be used as an additional tool in special circumstances. It is a test where you are placed within a large magnet and scanned while being given a contrast material called gadolinium through an intravenous line. As with ultrasound, it does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. It takes approximately 30-40 minutes to complete the examination and results are generally available in two business days. Your radiologist or one of your other physicians will tell you if this special test is recommended for you.

Bone Densitometry (DEXA Scan)

At Murray Hill Radiology and Mammography, we use DEXA (Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry) technology for our bone densitometry exams. Bone Densitometry is a noninvasive test performed to evaluate the density of the bones and assess for the presence of osteoporosis. This test uses low dose x-rays to assess the bones in the lower spine and hips, and sometimes the wrist. If bone density is decreased compared with normal, the risk for fracture is increased. When used over time, DEXA can detect even the smallest gain or loss in bone density. If you like, one of our radiologists will meet with you after your test, explain the results, and answer your questions.

Pelvic Sonogram / Transabdominal or Transvaginal

Transvaginal and transabdominal pelvic ultrasound are noninvasive exams that utilize sound waves to look at the structures in the body. Unlike x-ray exams, ionizing radiation is not used in this type of test. Your doctor will tell you if you need one of these tests either for routine screening or to evaluate a problem you are having. One of our radiologists will meet with you after your exam is performed, discuss the results, and make recommendations.