Cancer Imaging | RadNet
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Cancer Imaging Image

A variety of imaging techniques — CT, MRI, ultrasound and X-ray — are used to help diagnose cancer in the body. Radiologists also help identify cancer cells through biopsies. Since Radiology addresses every system in the body, we’re uniquely positioned to collaborate with oncologists to handle multi-stage, complex cancer cases.

 

Some Cancer Imaging Procedures Include:

3D Mammography

3D mammography (tomosynthesis) is an FDA-approved technology that complements conventional 2D mammography. While traditional mammography generates 2D images, 3D mammography creates multiple thin 3D image slices that allow each section of the breast tissue to be seen more clearly.

A 3D mammogram looks and feels like a regular mammogram. An x-ray arm scans over your breast taking multiple 3D images at various angles. Each scan takes about 4 seconds and the entire 3D mammogram lasts about 15-20 minutes.

Breast MRI

Some women — because of their family history, a genetic tendency or certain other factors — should be screened with MRI in addition to mammograms. The number of women who fall into this category is small: less than 2 percent of all the women in the United States. Talk with your doctor about your history and whether you should have additional tests.

Breast MRI helps to detect small lesions sometimes missed by mammography — without using radiation or compressing the breasts. MRI uses powerful magnets and radio waves to take very clear pictures of soft tissues, so it can be extremely useful in breast imaging.

Breast Ultrasound

Ultrasound uses sound waves instead of X-rays to exam breast tissue. A transducer is passed over the breast. The transmitted sound waves are translated into a picture on a monitor. It does not cause discomfort and, because it does not use radiation, it carries very little risk.

Ultrasound is useful for women with dense breasts or for evaluating suspicious areas seen by mammography or felt during a breast exam. It can also find breast lesions that are close to the chest, where mammography is less useful. Breast ultrasound can distinguish between cysts, which are fluid-filled, versus other types of solid breast masses.

Lower Dose 3D Mammography

3D mammography (tomosynthesis) is an FDA-approved technology that complements conventional 2D mammography. While traditional mammography generates 2D images, 3D mammography creates multiple thin 3D image slices that allow each section of the breast tissue to be seen more clearly.

New imaging software used with our 3D mammogram units enables us to offer a lower-dose 3D exam. The software eliminates the need to obtain additional 2D images as part of the 3D exam, as previously required. This reduces the radiation dose, making it similar to that of a traditional 2D mammogram.

A 3D mammogram looks and feels like a regular mammogram. An x-ray arm scans over your breast taking multiple 3D images at various angles. Each scan takes about 4 seconds and the entire 3D mammogram lasts about 15-20 minutes.

Lower Dose Lung CT Screening

Lung cancer CT screening is one of the most accurate diagnostic tools for finding lung cancer at an early stage, when it is most treatable. CT scans of the lung are able to detect small abnormalities in the lungs that could be the beginning stages of lung cancer. These indicators are often not visible on a routine chest X-ray. Since a CT lung screening offers the best opportunity for successful treatment of lung cancer before symptoms are noticed, more physicians are opting for lung cancer screening based on risk factors (like smoking and family history), rather than symptoms.

MRI Guided Breast Biopsy

MRI-guided biopsy uses MRI to guide the radiologist to the exact location of the area of concern. MRI biopsy is usually used when the abnormality can be best seen on breast MRI, but not as well visualized on mammogram or ultrasound. Often lesions that are biopsied are done under the imaging modality that best demonstrates them.

Image-guided biopsy allows patients to avoid hospitalization and general anesthesia (previously necessary with traditional surgical biopsy). It is a valuable method of getting a fast, accurate, conclusive diagnosis—without unnecessary time, pain or expense to the patient.

Prostate MRI

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the structures within a man’s prostate gland. It is primarily used to evaluate the extent of prostate cancer and determine whether it has spread. It also may be used to help diagnose infection, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or congenital abnormalities.

Prostate Ultrasound

Ultrasound is a non-invasive procedure that uses sound waves to image the structure and movement of the body’s internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels, in real-time. The prostate gland and surrounding tissue are examined by the insertion of an ultrasound probe into the patient’s rectum. There are no harmful effects, and it gives a clearer picture of soft tissues than X-ray images.

Renal Ultrasound

A renal ultrasound is a safe and painless test that uses sound waves to produce images of the kidneys and bladder. The kidneys are a pair of bean-shaped organs located toward the back of the abdominal cavity, just above the waist. They remove waste products from the blood and produce urine.  

Scrotum Ultrasound

Ultrasound imaging of the scrotum uses sound waves to produce an image of a man’s testicles and the surrounding tissue. It is primarily used to help evaluate disorders of the testicles, and scrotum. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation.

Sodium Fluoride Bone

Positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) are state-of-the-art diagnostic imaging tools. A PET/CT scan with a sodium fluoride injection is an imaging test that scans the entire skeletal system and produces images of the bones. These images are used to detect areas of abnormal bone growth associated with tumors that may have spread from different parts of the body.

Stereotactic Breast Biopsy

Stereotactic biopsy uses mammography to precisely guide clinicians to a lump or abnormality such as an area of calcification, that cannot be felt or seen on ultrasound. Clinicians see a 3D picture of the lump’s exact location.

Image-guided biopsy allows patients to avoid hospitalization and general anesthesia (previously necessary with traditional surgical biopsy). It is a valuable method of getting a fast, accurate, conclusive diagnosis—without unnecessary time, pain or expense to the patient.

 

Thyroid Imaging

A thyroid scan shows, in video images, how well a patient’s thyroid is functioning, along with its structure and position. This type of study can be used to diagnose hyperthyroidism, cancer, and other abnormalities, such as lumps or inflammation, in this important organ. Like other scans that are used to determine whether an organ is functioning properly, a thyroid scan is a nuclear medicine test; that is, it uses intravenous radiotracers detected by a special camera to provide pictures that show

Thyroid Ultrasound

Thyroid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce images of the thyroid gland in the neck. This procedure is typically used to evaluate lumps (or nodules) found during a routine physical and to determine if they are the more common benign nodule or if they have features that require a biopsy. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation.